Vision Zero

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Vision Zero Houston logo featuring street shared with person riding biking, people in a car, people on a bus, person using a wheelchair, and group of people walking including a child and person with a cane. Tagline: our streets, our lives, our commitment.

ABOUT

Everyone deserves safe, accessible streets and sidewalks. That’s why Houston is committed to ending traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030. We can prevent people from dying on our roadways. No loss of life is acceptable.

Vision Zero Houston prioritizes safety and accessibility in street design for people of all ages and abilities. It requires collaboration and leadership to improve mobility through engineering, enforcement, education, evaluation, and equity. Vision Zero Houston is a comprehensive and holistic approach to safer streets that supports the common good and enhances the quality of life for all Houstonians.



Vision Zero Progress Continues:
Safer Streets, Actions Complete

December 11, 2023 -- Mayor Sylvester Turner’s vision for a transportation paradigm shift continues to take shape for Houston.

Vision Zero Houston is the City’s commitment to end traffic deaths and serious injuries on Houston streets by 2030.

Crashes, fatalities and serious injuries decreased on Houston streets in 2022 for the first time since the Vision Zero Houston Plan was released in 2020, according to the Vision Zero 2022 Annual Report. The report shows there were 8 fewer deaths and 28 fewer serious injuries in 2022 than 2021. So far in 2023, the downward trend in overall traffic fatalities across all modes of transportation is holding steady, with 30 fewer deaths in the first nine months of 2023 compared to the same period in 2022. Statistics presented in the Vision Zero Annual Report are based on the TxDOT Crash Records Information System. The results of these completed and the ongoing actions are clear: safer streets for all Houstonians.

The Vision Zero Action Plan identified the City’s 50 actions to achieve this goal. As of December 2023, 12 of those actions had been completed including:

  • Action 1.1: Create a public-facing dashboard with quarterly updates and annual report card with full analysis.
  • Action 2.1: Shift citywide Traffic Impact Analysis standards from Vehicle Level of Service to Multimodal Level of Service (see Infrastructure Design Manual, Chapter 15.2.01).
  • Action 2.9: Require construction sites to provide safe and convenient pedestrian, bicycle, wheelchair, and transit access (see Infrastructure Design Manual, Chapter 17.2.03).
  • Action 2.15: Designate citywide freight network.

“In August, we announced that overall fatalities and serious injuries on Houston streets reduced from 2022 to 2021. As we end the year, we are still waiting on some final data, but we can happily report that positive progress continues to be on track for 2023,” Mayor Turner said. “We can never replace those who have died in 2023, but 30 fewer deaths so far this year is reason for reflection and thanks. The results speak for themselves -- our comprehensive approach of safety and multimodal planning is making Houston a safer city.”

“As I complete my administration as your mayor, I will remember signing the Vision Zero executive order among the most impactful public safety decisions I made,” he said. “I am confident that the City of Houston is poised, prepared and committed to taking every step within our ability to realize our goal of eliminating deaths and serious injuries by 2030.”

In 2022, drivers and occupants represented 50% of traffic deaths and 72% of serious injuries. Pedestrians represented 36% of traffic deaths and 16% of serious injuries. Motorcyclists & others represented 11% of traffic deaths and 10% of traffic deaths, while pedalcyclists represented 3% of traffic deaths and 2% of serious injuries.

Improvements in Street Safety Design
Every intersection redesigned under Vision Zero has shown improved safety metrics. Along segments of roadways that have had Vision Zero-aligned safety improvements that reduce conflict between road users and/or support safe vehicle speeds, the annual number of crashes with injuries has decreased by 26% and all annual crashes on those corridors have decreased by 19%. No one using a protected bike lane was killed.

On Gray Street from Bagby Street to Hamilton Street, average annual crashes that resulted in injuries reduced by 34% and all average annual crashes reduced by 22% since the street was improved in 2019.

  • On McKinney Street from Main Street to La Branch Street, average annual crashes that resulted in injuries remained the same and all average annual crashes reduced by 13% since the street was improved in 2019.
  • On Austin Street from Holman Street to Commerce Street, average annual crashes that resulted in injuries reduced by 17% and all average annual crashes reduced by 15% since the street was improved in 2020.
  • On Bagby Street from Clay Street to Franklin Street, average annual crashes that resulted in injuries reduced by 75% and all average annual crashes reduced by 45% since the street was improved in 2021.
  • On Hillcroft Avenue from High Star Street to Westward Street, average annual crashes that resulted in injuries reduced by 27% and all average annual crashes reduced by 8% since the street was improved in 2021.
Vision Zero-aligned planning, design and outreach are under the guidance of the Transportation Planning Division of the Planning and Development Department. Read the full Vision Zero 2022 Annual Report for more statistics, highlights, and ongoing efforts.




Click below to view the November 2020 Vision Zero Action Plan.






ABOUT

Everyone deserves safe, accessible streets and sidewalks. That’s why Houston is committed to ending traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030. We can prevent people from dying on our roadways. No loss of life is acceptable.

Vision Zero Houston prioritizes safety and accessibility in street design for people of all ages and abilities. It requires collaboration and leadership to improve mobility through engineering, enforcement, education, evaluation, and equity. Vision Zero Houston is a comprehensive and holistic approach to safer streets that supports the common good and enhances the quality of life for all Houstonians.



Vision Zero Progress Continues:
Safer Streets, Actions Complete

December 11, 2023 -- Mayor Sylvester Turner’s vision for a transportation paradigm shift continues to take shape for Houston.

Vision Zero Houston is the City’s commitment to end traffic deaths and serious injuries on Houston streets by 2030.

Crashes, fatalities and serious injuries decreased on Houston streets in 2022 for the first time since the Vision Zero Houston Plan was released in 2020, according to the Vision Zero 2022 Annual Report. The report shows there were 8 fewer deaths and 28 fewer serious injuries in 2022 than 2021. So far in 2023, the downward trend in overall traffic fatalities across all modes of transportation is holding steady, with 30 fewer deaths in the first nine months of 2023 compared to the same period in 2022. Statistics presented in the Vision Zero Annual Report are based on the TxDOT Crash Records Information System. The results of these completed and the ongoing actions are clear: safer streets for all Houstonians.

The Vision Zero Action Plan identified the City’s 50 actions to achieve this goal. As of December 2023, 12 of those actions had been completed including:

  • Action 1.1: Create a public-facing dashboard with quarterly updates and annual report card with full analysis.
  • Action 2.1: Shift citywide Traffic Impact Analysis standards from Vehicle Level of Service to Multimodal Level of Service (see Infrastructure Design Manual, Chapter 15.2.01).
  • Action 2.9: Require construction sites to provide safe and convenient pedestrian, bicycle, wheelchair, and transit access (see Infrastructure Design Manual, Chapter 17.2.03).
  • Action 2.15: Designate citywide freight network.

“In August, we announced that overall fatalities and serious injuries on Houston streets reduced from 2022 to 2021. As we end the year, we are still waiting on some final data, but we can happily report that positive progress continues to be on track for 2023,” Mayor Turner said. “We can never replace those who have died in 2023, but 30 fewer deaths so far this year is reason for reflection and thanks. The results speak for themselves -- our comprehensive approach of safety and multimodal planning is making Houston a safer city.”

“As I complete my administration as your mayor, I will remember signing the Vision Zero executive order among the most impactful public safety decisions I made,” he said. “I am confident that the City of Houston is poised, prepared and committed to taking every step within our ability to realize our goal of eliminating deaths and serious injuries by 2030.”

In 2022, drivers and occupants represented 50% of traffic deaths and 72% of serious injuries. Pedestrians represented 36% of traffic deaths and 16% of serious injuries. Motorcyclists & others represented 11% of traffic deaths and 10% of traffic deaths, while pedalcyclists represented 3% of traffic deaths and 2% of serious injuries.

Improvements in Street Safety Design
Every intersection redesigned under Vision Zero has shown improved safety metrics. Along segments of roadways that have had Vision Zero-aligned safety improvements that reduce conflict between road users and/or support safe vehicle speeds, the annual number of crashes with injuries has decreased by 26% and all annual crashes on those corridors have decreased by 19%. No one using a protected bike lane was killed.

On Gray Street from Bagby Street to Hamilton Street, average annual crashes that resulted in injuries reduced by 34% and all average annual crashes reduced by 22% since the street was improved in 2019.

  • On McKinney Street from Main Street to La Branch Street, average annual crashes that resulted in injuries remained the same and all average annual crashes reduced by 13% since the street was improved in 2019.
  • On Austin Street from Holman Street to Commerce Street, average annual crashes that resulted in injuries reduced by 17% and all average annual crashes reduced by 15% since the street was improved in 2020.
  • On Bagby Street from Clay Street to Franklin Street, average annual crashes that resulted in injuries reduced by 75% and all average annual crashes reduced by 45% since the street was improved in 2021.
  • On Hillcroft Avenue from High Star Street to Westward Street, average annual crashes that resulted in injuries reduced by 27% and all average annual crashes reduced by 8% since the street was improved in 2021.
Vision Zero-aligned planning, design and outreach are under the guidance of the Transportation Planning Division of the Planning and Development Department. Read the full Vision Zero 2022 Annual Report for more statistics, highlights, and ongoing efforts.




Click below to view the November 2020 Vision Zero Action Plan.






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