Livable Places

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What is Livable Places?

The Livable Places initiative is a continuation of the Planning Department’s effort to update portions of Houston’s development codes to enhance walkability, affordability and equity.

Following City Council's approval of the Walkable Places and Transit-Oriented Development ordinance amendments in August 2020, the Livable Places Action Committee will focus on updating the City’s development codes to encourage the development and preservation of affordable, quality housing for all.

The committee aims to create opportunities to:

  • build housing on existing vacant lots within neighborhoods that are largely developed
  • increase housing options with access to alternative transportation, such as bicycling and mass transit
  • improve safety
  • preserve great neighborhoods

This effort draws from community preferences identified through several previous planning initiatives including Plan Houston, Resilient Houston and others.

Use this page to provide input and feedback to the committee. Visit here often to find out about meetings, ask questions, participate in discussions and surveys, and to learn more. Your participation is important to help guide how Houston develops.

Livable Places Action Committee Meeting


ADU Design Competition: The Planning and Development Department’s recent ADU|HOU Design Competition received enthusiastic response from architects and design professionals, and has garnered about 30 submissions of Accessory Dwelling Unit schematic designs and concepts.

VOTING NOW OPEN

Log in or register to cast you ballot.


Workshop 3 - Costs and Financing: The City of Houston Planning & Development Department is hosting a series of virtual workshops focused on Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU’s) funded by a 2021 Community Challenge Grant from AARP. The third workshop, scheduled on Tuesday, October 26, 2021 at 6 p.m. Register for the Workshop 3 - Costs and Financing.

Watch past ADU Workshop 1 - Benefits and Basics.

Watch pas ADU Workshop 2 - How to ADU | HOU.


Learn More

In the Articles Tab, you will find various reading material that can provide context and definitions to support and provide meaning to the work the Livable Places Action Committee will discuss during its monthly meetings.

In the Proposed Amendments Tab, you will find information on various amendments proposed through the Committee's work. You can send us your comments or questions if any or start a forum discussion.

Thank you for your participation!

What is Livable Places?

The Livable Places initiative is a continuation of the Planning Department’s effort to update portions of Houston’s development codes to enhance walkability, affordability and equity.

Following City Council's approval of the Walkable Places and Transit-Oriented Development ordinance amendments in August 2020, the Livable Places Action Committee will focus on updating the City’s development codes to encourage the development and preservation of affordable, quality housing for all.

The committee aims to create opportunities to:

  • build housing on existing vacant lots within neighborhoods that are largely developed
  • increase housing options with access to alternative transportation, such as bicycling and mass transit
  • improve safety
  • preserve great neighborhoods

This effort draws from community preferences identified through several previous planning initiatives including Plan Houston, Resilient Houston and others.

Use this page to provide input and feedback to the committee. Visit here often to find out about meetings, ask questions, participate in discussions and surveys, and to learn more. Your participation is important to help guide how Houston develops.

Livable Places Action Committee Meeting


ADU Design Competition: The Planning and Development Department’s recent ADU|HOU Design Competition received enthusiastic response from architects and design professionals, and has garnered about 30 submissions of Accessory Dwelling Unit schematic designs and concepts.

VOTING NOW OPEN

Log in or register to cast you ballot.


Workshop 3 - Costs and Financing: The City of Houston Planning & Development Department is hosting a series of virtual workshops focused on Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU’s) funded by a 2021 Community Challenge Grant from AARP. The third workshop, scheduled on Tuesday, October 26, 2021 at 6 p.m. Register for the Workshop 3 - Costs and Financing.

Watch past ADU Workshop 1 - Benefits and Basics.

Watch pas ADU Workshop 2 - How to ADU | HOU.


Learn More

In the Articles Tab, you will find various reading material that can provide context and definitions to support and provide meaning to the work the Livable Places Action Committee will discuss during its monthly meetings.

In the Proposed Amendments Tab, you will find information on various amendments proposed through the Committee's work. You can send us your comments or questions if any or start a forum discussion.

Thank you for your participation!

Leave a comment, question or recommendation

Your input is important to us. Use this space for general comments and questions. More detailed inquiries can be sent to livableplaces@houstontx.gov

You need to be signed in to comment in this Guest Book. Click here to Sign In or Register to get involved

Hello, Ladies and Gentlemen,
I was unaware of the work of your Committee until this week. I live at 2405 Mimosa Drive which is a neighborhood that fits within the issues that you are addressing. We are a small neighborhood comprised of townhomes and a few 2 story, old apartments, on a dead end street.

There is planned midrise development in the middle of one block between two homes and another at the end of the street. And, at the south end of Mimosa, now planned is a mid-rise. Although, what was represented to the Mimosa Commons buyers was development of more townhomes. These two mid-rise buildings are extremely dense for a small street with residential townhomes.

I am wondering if you would be interested in photos of our small street and what is planned and whether there is any voice in what is planned for the neighborhood's residents.

Thank you,
Mary Jo Sandlin

Mary Sandlin 4 months ago

I could not pin my neighborhood which is westheimer and Weslayan area
I am generally concerned about the city not requiring developers to provide green space for their tenants and surrounding homeowners. I have been to so many cities that have green spaces every few blocks for the neighborhood. Large parks are great but smaller green spaces encourages a neighborhood feel, a place to meet neighbors, exercise and walk your pets. Without these we will be a concrete jungle only going in and out of our driveways.
The other major consideration is the traffic being created on small streets and cross streets. We are a city of cars, like it or not. We are very spread out and walking is usually not an option.
In addition parking becomes a problem - more cars than space resulting in constant parking in neighborhoods which creates a crime issues.

Please take these issues into considering when giving developers permits for these buildings. I hope the city will require more stringent guidelines for these high rises that directly affect our neighborhoods.
Thank you for volunteering for this commission and inviting comments.

Joan Pratka 10 months ago

The addresses listed below are just a small fraction of the commercial properties directly next to residential homes in the Trinity/Houston Gardens area. There is no type of buffering and most of the companies are un-permitted commercial truck yards and junk yards.
7500 Tipton Houston, TX 77028
6800 Landor Houston, TX 77028
6720 Weaver Houston, TX 77028
8525 Bertwood Houston, TX 77028
6100 Laura Koppe Houston, TX 77028
8500 Bertwood Houston, TX 77028
6101 Laura Koppe Houston, TX 77028
6114 Laura Koppe Houston, TX 77028
6200 Laura Koppe Houston, TX 77028
6206 Laura Koppe Houston, TX 77028
8420 Lanewood Houston, TX 77028
8708 Lanewood Houston, TX 77028
8810 Spaulding Houston, TX 77016
7740 Wileyvale Houston, TX 77016
5002 Denmark Houston, TX 77016

klynchgunter 10 months ago

Highrises are popping up like mushrooms in Houston. This is great for the city of Houston but really impacts the lives of residents when these buildings are in their backyards. Forget about calm, peace, privacy and sun. The prject of Randall Davis on Westheimer is really a nonsense. ...22 stories on a lot the size of ours in Royden Oaks.
We already have on Wickersham this new appartment building of 8 stories. The trafic is crazy, the parking is a big problem...not mentionning the trucks of maintenance driving through our street....damaging it..Is that going to be repaired by the city?

Daumerie 10 months ago

Westgrove Court Community Association represents the 32 residential lots on Eastgrove and
Westgrove Lanes off of Westheimer near the corner of Westheimer and Wesleyan. This quiet community has already expressed its opposition to the 27 residential high-rise that has been announced for the entrance into our neighborhood at the corner of Eastgrove Lane and Westheimer. Our concerns include the additional residents in our neighborhood that will require additional city resources, eg. water, power, sewage, parking, etc. We are also concerned about the height of the building and the amount of shading caused by this high of a structure. It will be an eyesore in our neighborhood. The traffic through the neighborhood is of major concern. This area around the intersection of Wesleyan and Westheimer already has enough construction. Our HOA board is available to answer additional questions. Arthur Epley. President, Westgrove Court Community Association.

awepley 10 months ago

I have just suffered through the construction of Colombe d'Or. The noisy crane... starting before 7am and working late hours.... leaving the crane light on overnight. The trash in my backyard, pool and street, Now with Kroger and the SW corner of Montrose and Westheimer sold and slated for redevelopment I can only imagine more pain and suffering. The biggest issue is the parking of construction workers. They park all over leaving no space for visitors or single family home maintenance workers. When I applied for permitted parking before it was denied bc the city said the construction was temporary.. it seems like it is eternal.I'd like to at least be able to parallel park and block my OWN driveway and not be ticketed or towed. Can we come up with a permit for at least that so I'll be guaranteed at least one street spot in front of my house during all of this upcoming construction????? I live on Hawthorne between Yoakum and Mt Vernon.

dq 10 months ago

It is important that we preserve the texture and historical value of our neighborhoods. We can not have corporate injustices via tall structures erected in residents communities. That blout out sunlight, raise property taxes and among other things is an eyesore on the landscape.

Keith Downey 10 months ago

A completely “too large” proposed 22 story high-rise development on a property that is woefully unable to support it. The “main thoroughfare (Bissonet) is a single-lanes street without any left-turn lane or median, and the single side street is residential. The property is surrounded on the other two sides by two-story residential structures. There is inadequate lay-down area to support the proposed construction and no possible worker parking facility. Please review previous lawsuit filings for all proposed development deficiencies.

touch33 10 months ago

As a homeowner of property that backs up to the proposed Ashby Highrise, I am very aware and fearful of an oversized building going up behind me. The Ashby proposal had all the a/c and heating units for the proposed 21 story building immediately next to my backyard, which is very small. I was afraid it would sound like an airport runway in my backyard. These large buildings need more setback requirements so the quality of life for we homeowners isn't affected by the developers' greed.

Penelope Loughhead 10 months ago

COH should consider what can be done in older traditional subdisions of mostly 1-2 story single family residences where restrictions have no height restrictions on new SFRs. This is residential adjoining residential, not commercial adjoining residential. 70-90 years ago some developers didn't anticipate or even inagine the pressure or demand on residential areas.

New comment. What was the thinking behind including the commercial property on the north side of Holcombe near Montclair in the Medical Center area exempted from the commercial buffering rules? Thx

Spaine 10 months ago
Page last updated: 15 October 2021, 10:53